Four common myths about vaccinations

Vaccines keep your child safe


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  • | 9:00 a.m. November 24, 2016
  • Winter Park - Maitland Observer
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Four common myths about vaccinations

As a parent, you do whatever it takes to keep your child safe and healthy, and vaccinations are an important means of accomplishing that goal. Vaccinations protect children from avoidable illnesses that can result in serious health consequences ranging from paralysis to hearing and vision loss, brain damage and even death. By having your child vaccinated, you can protect not only his or her health, but also the health of others with whom they come in contact – including family and friends, babies who are too young for vaccinations, and older people with compromised immune systems.

At Loch Haven Pediatrics, we understand that a main part of parenting is worrying – worrying about the safety of vaccines, worrying about side effects, and above all else, worrying if vaccines are even necessary. We’re here to tell you that yes, vaccines are 100 percent necessary for the health and wellbeing of your child. To help put your mind at ease on this subject, let us clear up some of the most often-repeated myths about vaccine use, as noted below.

  1. Vaccines aren’t safe. False - Every vaccine must go through a rigorous review process and be approved by scientists, doctors and the federal government to make sure it is safe and effective.

  2. Most diseases we’re vaccinated for don’t exist anymore. False - Some uncommon diseases in the United States are still very common and prevalent in other countries. These diseases are brought to the United States regularly, and if a child is not vaccinated, he or she is at a higher risk of contracting a serious illness.

  3. It’s better to contract a disease and let the body build up a defense. False – Vaccines work with the immune system to create an immune response similar to a natural infection, without creating the actual disease. By waiting until a child gets a natural infection, you are putting them at risk for a number of health complications such as mental retardation stemming from a Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infection, birth defects, Hepatitis B, liver cancer, or even the possibility of death from a measles infection.

  4. Vaccines cause autism. False – Despite what was published in a now retracted, highly flawed study back in the ’90s, there is no evidence that the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine causes autism or autistic disorders.

Our physicians, Danuta Deeb, MD, FAAP, and Tad Nowicki, MD, FAAP, have been dedicated to children’s health and safety for over 25 years. This is why we don’t accept new patients who haven’t had their basic immunizations. If you are looking for a practice to administer immunizations to a child who is of age, then look no further than Loch Haven Pediatrics. Our team strives to provide world-class healthcare for kids aged newborn to 18 in the greater Orlando area. We look forward to helping you and your family live a long and healthy life!

Our dedicated team is here for you at every stage of your child’s development. If you have questions or would like to schedule an appointment, visit LochHavenPediatrics.com or give our office a call at 407-898-4116.

About Loch Have Pediatrics: Loch Haven Pediatrics has been providing evidence-based pediatric care to the greater Orlando area for over 25 years. Drs. Danuta Deeb and Tad Nowicki offer comprehensive, primary pediatric services including pre-natal consultations; well-child exams; immunizations; school and sports physicals; treatment of childhood illnesses, acne and other skin problems; care for minor injuries; and minor surgical procedures for newborns through age 18. They are proud members of Florida Hospital Medical Group (FHMG), Central Florida’s premier multi-specialty physician group and member of the Adventist Health System. With nearly 500 providers and over 130 locations throughout the greater Orlando area, FHMG physicians provide compassionate, multidisciplinary care to more than one million patients a year.

 

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